Book Reviews, Reading

Book Review: Midsummer Delights

Eloisa James, aka Mary Bly, was one of the first romance authors I ever read, so her titles hold a special place in my heart. Though her last few books haven’t wowed me the way that her Fairy Tales and Desperate Duchesses series did (see my review of Wilde in Love for Love in a Time of Feminism), she’s still one of my favourite authors, so when I got the email that Pure Textuality was organising a blog tour of Midsummer Delights, a collection of short stories, I jumped at the chance to review the book.

Book Info.Midsummer Delights by Eloisa James

Publication Date February 6, 2018

Midsummer Delights by Eloisa James

Series A Short Story Collection

Genre Adult Historical Romance

Publisher Avon Impulse

Amazon  http://amzn.to/2E4ooc3

Avon Romance   https://goo.gl/KYj3YP

Barnes & Noble  https://goo.gl/NYTGbz

Google Play  https://goo.gl/AijSyN

Walmart  https://goo.gl/SxiSTQ

iBooks  https://apple.co/2COtlXk

Review

This book contains three short stories about heroines and heroes finding a happily ever after with people they’ve known since childhood. The problem with short stories, especially in romance, is that it can be very difficult to adequately build up the relationship between the hero and heroine enough that the HEA seems believable, rather than just the de facto ending to all romance. Such was the case with the first and second stories in this collection. There just weren’t enough details about Cecilia and Theo to make their VERY SUDDEN falling in love and proposal at all believable. Theo also basically tells Cecilia he’s glad her brother has been bullied so much that it has ruined Cecilia’s prospects and caused her brother to retire to the country, because it meant that no one offered for her and he was free to scoop her up, so to speak. There are so many things wrong with this, but here are a few: 1. Theo is happy that Cecilia’s brother suffered what sounds like truly traumatic teasing and harassment because it means he gets to marry his lady love, so he’s obviously a selfish cock 2. Cecilia says NOTHING in response to Theo’s jerky comments and instead just gazes dreamily at him 3. From the sounds of it, Cecilia and Theo didn’t even get along well as children and adolescents, and she previously describes him as pudgy and spotty, yet somehow he’s been pining for her for years, and the minute she finds out he’s a talented musician, she’s ready to throw caution to the wind and fly off into the sunset with him? WHAT?! Theo then ends by saying that Billy, Cecilia’s brother, can live with them because he feels bad for him, and Cecilia again just acquiesces to his every word. Ugh.

The second story in this collection also suffers from a lack of adequate background details and an overall badly written plot. Elias is in love with Penny and has been his whole life, which his best friend also knows, yet his best friend is about to marry Penny, who is also ready to marry him, even though it turns out that Penny has also been in love with Elias for as long as he has been in love with her? WHAT! Are Elia’s BFF and Penny just jerks? If they truly cared about Elias, wouldn’t they just tell him to hang the manly pride that kept him from offering for Penny because oh hey, Penny feels the same way as he does! The friendship between Elias, Penny, and Reggie also needs way more background to make it believable. The only detail from their childhood mentioned is Penny beating Reggie up and Elias saving him.

The third story in this collection, however, is well-written, with a believable ending thanks to the ample background details we get about the hero and heroine that make their love totally honest and awesome to see come to fruition. Violet also takes absolutely no shit from Rothwell, refusing to bow to his charms and graces when he’s spent the last four years ignoring her, despite the strong connection and passionate kisses they shared as teenagers. Also, the sex scenes in this story are utterly delightful and very hot, and, the best part, Violet isn’t a virgin! Hurrah for non-virgin heroines. The regency needs more of them!

My only other criticism of this story collection is that in all three stories, the hero and heroine go out into the garden alone, and we all know that in the regency that is. not. done. unless you want to start a scandal that will have anxious mamas and ladies of the ton swooning where they stand. It’s one thing if the hero and heroine steal away to the garden for some illicit smooching, but they wouldn’t just walk out, calm as you please! I was pretty shocked when this happened because I always associate Eloisa James with thoroughly researched books.

So, if you’re going to pick up this book, stick to the last story, and the sneak peak of the next installation in the Wildes of Lindow Castle series, which looks SO JUICY and is high on my TBR.

 

Pure Text

 

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